After watching the Trombone Player Wanted video by Marcus Buckingham, I learned that less than 2 out of 10 people actually play to their strengths in their career. I am fortunate that I have a job that allows me to be in my “sweet spot” for most of the day, however there are times that I am put in uncomfortable situations that I realize are my weaknesses.

 I am a Basketball coach and I have my own business of personal training in basketball development and I have strength and weaknesses in both. As a coach, my strengths are being relatable, open and patient to the student players because I come from an extensive basketball background. During practices I want to make sure that each player is getting better at strengthening their weaknesses.  I understand what it takes to be a student athlete at all levels of basketball.  I can say one-on-one training is another “sweet spot” of mine.  The ability to train one person at a time allows me to correct their shot form, improve their ball handling and provide constructive criticism is easier because it’s more personable.  The one-on-one time allows for me to observe and hear what the player has to say so that it is a two-way interaction. 

In a team environment with all the players, I consider my weakness to having a limited time frame with each of my players. In order to have an effective practice and to be prepared for a game we have to practice drills that split them into smaller groups to work with the assistant coaches. My weakness in personal training is being my own worst critic. I constantly think I could have taught them regardless of the positive feedback that I hear from the parents and the kids that I train. I need to remind myself that even
though I consider these to be weakness, in the end they are actually playing to my strengths. I refuse to be the other 8 out of 10 people that  do not play to their strengths

5/14/2013 01:28:13 am

Hey Shannon,
It was very interesting to read your post because I can relate in several ways. I am also an assistant women's basketball coach at Santa Barbara City College, and my strength or should we call it "Sweet Spot," is when I work with my players one-on-one. I do one-on-one training with my guards before practice, and like you said when you have that one-on-one interaction you can really tap into a players strengths and weakness, and that in the end can help them be an overall better player. I would also have to agree with you on not having a longer time frame, as coaches we want to do as much as we can for players but realistically sometimes there are only one or two of us to go around. That can defiantly be a weakness because you worry and develop guilt because you can not working with every player one-on-one within a time frame.
I look forward to reading more of your post.

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Arthur Berlanga
5/16/2013 08:06:23 pm

I really enjoyed reading your blog posts. You have a great heart for people, and it seems that you especially love one-on-one instruction, whether it be basketball or training. I like when you identified this when you stated, "The ability to train one person at a time allows me to correct their shot form, improve their ball handling and provide constructive criticism is easier because it’s more personable. The one-on-one time allows for me to observe and hear what the player has to say so that it is a two-way interaction." Part of mastering our craft is to continue to strengthen our strengths like Marcus' video mentions. Nice job. Well articulated as well.

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Devery Ortiz
5/19/2013 10:30:31 pm

Shannon,
I enjoyed reading your post. I felt the exact same way when I first read Marcus's book. I also took an assessment that helps show what your actual strengths are. I noticed that you said that you like a more "one on one" approach, I feel the same way. Whenever I interact with my athletes, I prefer to be one on one or at least in a small group. I feel that my instruction is more effective that way.

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    Shannon Taylor
    Head Basketball coach at Kerman High School. Currently a graduate student at Fresno Pacific University for Kinesiology with an emphasis in Physical Education

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